Autism Spectrum Disorders and Visual Impairment

autism spectrum disorders and visualAutism Spectrum Disorders and Visual Impairment by Marilyn H. Gense and D. Jay Gense.

(XOT Gense 2005)

This book includes topics such as understanding ASD and visual impairment, program planning and instructional strategies, career education, recreations and leisure, and classroom supports. Pp. 329.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.

Visual Recipes: A Cookbook for Non-Readers

visual recipesVisual Recipes: A Cookbook for Non-Readers by Tabitah Orth.

(XOT Orth 2006)

This cookbook is laid out entirely with pictorial and text descriptions on how to cook basic recipes. The step by step instructions are short, clear, and easy to understand. The book has 35 total recipes for breakfast, lunch, dinner, side orders, snacks, deserts, and drinks. It was written specifically for people with autism and other developmental disabilities who are non readers so that they could become more independent in the kitchen.  Pp.107.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.

Visual Support for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

Visual Support for ChildrenVisual Support for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders by Vera Bernard-Opitz.

(XED Berna 2011)

With hundreds of colorful illustrations and step-by-step directions, this book lays the foundation for how to structure teaching environments, as well as offers countless examples of activities for students, ranging from basic skills, to reading and math, to social behavior.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.

Practical Ideas that Really Work for Students with Asperger Syndrome

Practical IdeasPractical Ideas that Really Work for Students with Asperger Syndrome  by Kathleen McConnell.

(XED McCon 2005)

This book includes 40 classroom strategies accompanied by worksheets, lists, and visual aids. Pp. 181.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.

Teaching Conversation to Children with Autism

teachingconversationTeaching Conversation to Children with Autism by Lynn E. McClannahan and Patricia J. Krantz.

(XCM McCla 2005)

By reading this book you will understand how scripts and script fading can provide a predictable and meaningful structure for children and adults with autism to engage in conversation.  By using this strategy, children begin by playing recorded words or phrases to initiate conversation and often progress to speaking spontaneously with other children or adults. Pp. 155.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.

Comic Strip Conversations: Illustrated Interactions that Teach Conversation Skills to Students with Autism and Related Disorders

comicstripComic Strip Conversations:  Illustrated Interactions that Teach Conversation Skills to Students with Autism and Related Disorders by Carol Gray.

(XBC Gray 1994)

This is a book of comic strip conversations that illustrate ongoing communication and provides additional support to individuals who struggle to comprehend the quick exchange of information that occurs in a conversation.  These strips identify what people say and do, and emphasize what people may be thinking. Pp. 37.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.

A Pictures Worth: PECS and other Visual Communication Strategies in Autism

apicturesworthA Pictures Worth:  PECS and other Visual Communication Strategies in Autism by Andy Bondy.

(XBC Bondy 2002)

This easy-to-understand guide presents in detail the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) — pictures used by a child to express his needs and desires without a prompt from another person — as well as an overview of other augmentative and alternative communication systems. Pp. 300.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.

Teach Me Language: A Language Manual for children with autism, Asperger’s syndrome and related developmental disorders

teachmelanguageTeach Me Language: A Language Manual for children with autism, Asperger’s syndrome and related developmental disorders by Sabrina, Ph.D. Freeman, Lorelei Dake, and Sabrina K. Freeman.

(XCM Freem 1997)

This step by step “How to” manual has instructions, explanations, examples, games and cards that attack language weaknesses common to children with pervasive developmental disorders aged kindergarten through teen years. Visual learners tend to benefit the most from this book which includes concepts such as social language, general knowledge, grammar and syntax, functional knowledge, written expression, and language-based academic concepts.  This book should be introduced once the child has learned one and two word sentences, has some basic vocabulary, and can answer simple questions from a picture book.  Pp. 410.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.

Visual Strategies for Improving Communication: Practical Supports for School & Home

visualstrategiesforimprovingcommunicationVisual Strategies for Improving Communication: Practical Supports for School & Home by Linda A. Hodgdon.

(XCM Hodgd 1995)

A comprehensive book used to explain the use of visual strategies in order to improve communication for students with autism spectrum disorders and other students who experience moderate to severe communication impairments.  It is full of easy to use techniques and strategies that will help these students participate more effectively in social interactions and life routines. Pp. 232.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.

What Did You Say? What Do You Mean?: An Illustrated Guide to Understanding Metaphors

whatdidyousay What Did You Say? What Do You Mean?: An Illustrated Guide to Understanding Metaphors by Jude Welton, Jane Telford, and Elizabeth Newson.

(XBC Welto 2004)

This visual workbook looks at a hundred of the most common figures of speech and is designed as a springboard for family and classroom discussions. Each figure of speech is accompanied by an illustration showing its literal meaning, which will help AS children recognize and learn to enjoy metaphors and figurative language. Pp. 128.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.

Tasks Galore: Creative Ideas for Teachers, Therapists and Parents Working with Children with Autism

tasksgaloreTasks Galore: Creative Ideas for Teachers, Therapists and Parents Working with Children with Autism by Laurie Eckenrode, Pat Fennell & Kathy Hearsey.

(XED Ecken 2003)

This book designed for teachers, therapists, and parents, assists in creating a fun and meaningful task collection. Emphasis is on helping any student/child feel successful. Pp. 66.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.

Tasks Galore for the Real World: Visually Structured Tasks for Teaching Domestic, Vocational and Other Independent Living Skills to Individuals with Autism

redtasksgaloreTasks Galore for the Real World: Visually Structured Tasks for Teaching Domestic, Vocational and Other Independent Living Skills to Individuals with Autism by Laurie Eckenrode, Pat Fennell & Kathy Hearsey.

(XED Ecken 2004)

This book is also designed for teachers, therapists, and parents, and features over 240 full-color photos of highly organized, multi-modal tasks that emphasize functional skills needed for daily living.  Each task includes visual strategies that enhance independence in the home, school, community and workplace. Pp. 58.

Tasks Galore: Making Groups Meaningful- Using Structured Teaching Strategies to Design Successful Group Activities

tasksgaloremakinggroupsmeaningfulTasks Galore: Making Groups Meaningful-Using Structured Teaching Strategies to Design Successful Group Activities by Laurie Eckenrode, Pat Fennell & Kathy Hearsey.

(XED Ecken 2005)

This book is designed for teachers. It features over 240 full-color photos of organized, multi-modal tasks that emphasize functional skills needed for successful group activities. Pp. 69.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.

Tasks Galore, Let’s Play

tasksgaloreletsplayTasks Galore, Let’s Play by Laurie Eckenrode, Pat Fennell, Kathy Heatsey, and Beth Reynolds.

(XED Ecken 2009)

This book utilizes play as the program for learning. Tasks Galore Let’s Play contains fun, multimodal tasks in full color that illustrate how routines, organizational strategies, and visual cues make play more understandable and enhance   students’ toy play, flexibility, and social interactions.  Printable visual supports are included that can be applied to multiple learning situations. Pp. 118.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.

Visual Thinking Strategies for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Visual Thinking StrategiesVisual Thinking Strategies for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders  by Ellyn Lucas Arwood, Carole Kaulitz, and Mabel Brown.

(XCM Arwoo 2009)

This book helps the reader understand how to match the developmental levels of pictures and visuals to the developmental level of the person looking at the visual. In this way, appropriate visuals provide the language development for children with autism spectrum disorders. Drawing from their experience with children and youth for decades, the   authors also show how effective communication can help reduce the confusion and anxiety that often lead to behavioral outbursts. Pp. 80.

If available,item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.


Making Visual Supports Work in the Home and Community Strategies for Individuals with Autism and Asperger Syndrome

Visual SupportsMaking Visual Supports Work in the Home and Community Strategies for Individuals with Autism and Asperger Syndrome  by Jennifer L. Savner and Brenda Smith Myles.

(XCM Savne 2000)

Visual supports help children and youth with autism, Asperger Syndrome and other special needs understand their world better and therefore help them function more independently. This resource goes beyond the familiar use of visual supports as schedules with children with disabilities to include information sharers, checklists/organizers, and visual behavior supports. Richly illustrated and user-friendly, the book provides parents with all the information they need to make effective visual supports specifically designed for their child using a variety of materials, many of them commonly found around the house. Pp. 40.

If available, item can be checked out from the resource room at no cost.